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How to Prepare for Mediation

How to Prepare for Mediation

You’ve selected your mediator, and the mediation session is scheduled for next month. Preparing for mediation as thoroughly as possible is the key to achieving the best possible outcome. Where to begin?

1. You need a mediation plan. The plan will help you organize your preparation and deepen your understanding of the case. Your plan should consist of:
a. Determining your client’s and your own goals and objectives.
b. Identifying your client’s and your own true interests underlying the goals and objectives.
c. Developing a strategy for achieving those goals and objectives. Distinguish between needs and wants.
d. Considering various approaches at the mediation, both procedurally and substantively.
e. Realistically determining your alternatives if you cannot reach an agreement through mediation.
f. Considering the other party’s and counsel’s likely true interests as well as the other party’s likely      alternatives if no agreement is reached.

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Stipulated “Mediation Stay” Does Not Toll the Five-Year Mandatory Dismissal Period

Stipulated Mediation Stay Does Not Toll Five Year Mandatory Dismissal Period

California litigators know that cases must be brought to trial within five years or face mandatory dismissal. (C.C.P. Section 583.310). Time periods when “prosecution or trial of the action was stayed” or when bringing the action to trial was “impossible, impracticable, or futile” are excluded from the five-year calculation under C.C.P. Section 583.340.

In another decision throwing parties’ efforts to mediate under the wheels of the five-year rule, the California Supreme Court decided that a trial court order striking a trial date and staying the action following the plaintiff’s agreement to the defendants’ request to engage in mediation and complete outstanding discovery did not operate to toll the running of the five-year period. According to the majority, the “mediation stay” did not amount to a sufficiently complete stay or render the prosecution of the case impossible, impracticable, or futile to effect tolling. Gaines v. Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, et al., S215990 (filed 2/25/16)

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Power Play in Mediation and Negotiation – Expect the Unexpected

Power Play in Mediation and Negotiation

The ICC International Commercial Mediation Competition in Paris showcased many different approaches to business mediation and negotiation even within the predetermined format and criteria for performance. Even when cultural differences were insignificant, the mediations often turned in unpredictable directions depending on different personalities and negotiation techniques. This was an excellent demonstration of the many permutations of power play.

The ICC Competition Final at the Maison du Barreau was the perfect example of power play at work. The auditorium was huge, the stage bathed in spotlight. Hundreds of spectators anxiously awaited the final match between the University of New South Wales (Australia) and the University of Auckland (New Zealand). There were no significant cultural differences between the teams.

All of the spectators had access to the details of the conflict – a dispute between a celebrity baker and party planner-to-the-stars over a wedding cake disaster that occurred when the industry-changing icing jointly developed by the two slid off of the cake at the party planner’s daughter’s wedding. Both parties’ reputations, businesses, and cash flow were in trouble. Each sought money damages from the other.

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Paris Report No. 2 (the 2016 ICC Commercial Mediation Competition) – A World of Mediation Attitudes and Processes

Differing Attitudes and Processes in Mediation around the World PDF

Many of us often get caught up in our own way of doing things. In Southern California mediation practice, while there are often differences in process determined by counsel, party, or mediator preferences, most participants follow a pretty regular road to mediation in the first place. That’s because the prevailing experience at home is that either courts or a contract “force” everyone into mediation, with the effect of allowing all of the players to remain stalwart in their positions, at least at the outset.

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Report from the 2016 ICC International Commercial Mediation Competition in Paris – How Can There Be A “Competition” in Mediation?

Report from the 2016 ICC International Commercial Mediation Competition in Paris – How Can There Be A “Competition” in Mediation?

Mediation is supposed to be a “win-win” proposition, right? You never think of there being a winner or a loser in the process. In fact, avoiding a “win-lose” outcome is fundamental to the procedure. So how in the world can there be a construct such as an international commercial mediation “competition,” such as the extraordinary event I am currently attending in Paris?

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Danger Zone in California Civil Trial Courts – Private Mediation Does Not Toll the Five-Year Period for Bringing a Case to Trial

Danger Zone in California Civil Trial Courts – Private Mediation Does Not Toll the Five-Year Period for Bringing a Case to Trial PDF

It’s back. That risky zone in which a case can sneak past you and be subject to mandatory dismissal for the plaintiff’s failure to bring it to trial within five years. California Code of Civil Procedure § 583.310. Most of us never thought we would see the return of that pesky problem after the Los Angeles County Superior Court instituted the one-judge-one-case approach that created tremendous efficiencies in case management and got most parties through trial in under two years.

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Federal Case Dismissed for Failing to Comply with Contractual Pre-Filing ADR Requirement

Federal Case Dismissed for Failing to Comply with Contractual Pre-Filing ADR Requirement PDF

In a case involving an insurer’s dispute of coverage to pay the settlement of a data breach class action, Columbia Casualty Co. v. Cottage Health System, cv 15-03432 DDP (AGRx) (C.D. Cal. 2015), Judge Dean D. Pregerson of the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California granted a Rule 12(b)(6) motion to dismiss for the plaintiff insurer’s failure to comply with the insurance policy’s pre-filing ADR requirement.

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Managing Business Disputes

Managing Business Disputes

The phone rang, and the caller said: “My partner and I have been in business for four years, and I am pouring my heart and soul into making it a success, almost 24 hours a day. She, on the other hand, doesn’t work nearly as hard, can’t supervise any employees without making them either angry or tearful, spends too much money, and then announces she wants more money. I’m going out of my mind. What do I do?”

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“No-Employment” Provision Might Void a Settlement Agreement in California

“No-Employment” Provision Might Void a Settlement Agreement in California PDF

A new Ninth Circuit case holds that a settlement agreement with a non-compete provision that amounts to a substantial restraint on engaging in a profession may be void. In Golden v. California Emergency Physicians Medical Group, et al., (No. 12-16514, April 8, 2015), a physician’s settlement agreement with his former employer included a provision that the physician waive his rights to employment with the defendant or at any facility that the defendant may own or with which it may contract in the future.

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